Announcements

  • Click to watch the Feb. 10 Announcement broadcast.

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  • February's The Cyclone is here! What do we do at UCEC?

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  • Congratulations to UCEC's January Students of the Month: Kayla G., Corey A., Johon M., Benjamin G., Anghelina D., Kristal A., Leslie B., and Natalie H. Click to see why they were chosen.

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  • Free College Planning Session offered by Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) on Saturday, Feb. 13 from 9am-12:30pm. 

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  • The next Driver's Education class starts in March; you must register and pay for the class before it starts; Register now!

     

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Featured Stories

  • What's Your Perspective?

    When studying World War I, students researched the major European countries involved. In their research they were careful to find information from the perspective of the individual European countries involved. This was very interesting because as students in an American History class, they are often exposed to only one point of view. We discussed how history students in other countries view the participation of their country in world events. This also gave us an opportunity to discuss propaganda that is created from different perspectives as well as how sometimes, the attitude toward certain key historical events change over time. We then compared other countries with the United States. We discussed how people’s perspectives and attitudes toward our own historic events are generated by the mood of the country at the time. This study gave my students a new appreciation of history and encouraged them to judge the history of our country – and others – in the timeframe of when the events occurred.

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  • What's in a Name?

    Ms. Lashley’s English II class read and analyzed Socrates’s ancient Greek tragedy Oedipus Rex. A predominate theme in the play involves lessons Oedipus learns in the search for his true identity. To make a personal connection to the identity theme, students conducted online research to explore the meaning, history, origin, and cultural significance of their names. Presentations included PowerPoint, Prezi, Wordle, original drawings and other creative visuals to share with the class. Students were fascinated to learn that many of their names originated from various cultures. For example S. Helms learned that her surname is German, and her great-great grandfather immigrated to America from Germany. Kyrstan C. learned that her given name is Norwegian, and fewer than 30 people in the U.S. and UK combined share the unique spelling of her name. G. Aponte learned that her surname Aponte originated in Italy and Spain. In 1616, a number of Apontes settled in Coamo, Puerto Rico, and many of the student’s Aponte family members still reside in Puerto Rico today. C. Nguyen, whose cultural background includes Vietnamese and Chinese, learned that her surname is Vietnamese but originated from the Chinese name Ruan, which means a Chinese instrument.

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  • Math's Journey Around the World

    Mrs. Roncone’s AFM class has ridden a sinusoidal wave around the world figuring out how temperature patterns around the globe follow the trigonometric sine graphs. We have written trigonometric sine and cosine functions about the circular patterns of Ferris wheels in London, Singapore, and right here in our own backyard with the Myrtle Beach Sky Wheel. We have also used right triangle trigonometry to figure out heights of famous monuments and buildings like the Eiffel Tower.

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